The Sattipatthana Sutra: A dharma talk by Gary Zochi Faysash

Zochi reviews the Four Foundations of Mindfulness and offers a clear and simple path for using this teaching to enrich one’s meditation practice.

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Genjokoan: Dogen’s Teachings on Facing the Issue at Hand

Jishin Sensei offers an overview of Dogen’s advice for everyday living as human beings

Given November 9, 2019 at Southern Palm Zen Group

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Kyojukaimon: Dogen’s Teachings on Morality and Precepts

Mushin Sensei offers insights into the Great Precepts of the Buddhas

Given on October 12, 2019 at Southern Palm Zen Group

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Fukanzazengi: Dogen’s Fascicle on Zazen

Dharma talk by Jishin Sensei: Dogen’s teaching on the practice of Zazen

September 14, 2019 at Southern Palm Zen Group

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Fall Ango Information

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Uji, Dogen’s fascicle on Time

Dharma Talk by Zochi: Dogen’s Fascicle on Time
July 20 2019 Southern Palm Zen Group

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Zochi talks on Dogen’s Fascicle on Time.

——-

A Dharma talk (Sanskrit) or Dhamma talk (Pali) or Dharma sermon (Japanese: 法語 teisho[1] (ほうご, Hōgo), Chinese: 法語) is a public discourse on Buddhism by a Buddhist teacher.[1][2]

In some Zen traditions a Dharma talk may be referred to as a teisho.[3] However, according to Taizan Maezumi and Bernard Glassman,[4] a teisho is “a formal commentary by a Zen master on a koan or Zen text. In its strictest sense, teisho is non-dualistic and is thus distinguished from a Dharma talk, which is a lecture on a Buddhist topic.”[5] In this sense, a teisho is thus a formal Dharma talk.[6] Vietnamese master Thich Nhat Hanh says the following about Dharma talks:[7]

A Dharma talk must always be appropriate in two ways: it must accord perfectly with the spirit of the Dharma and it must also respond perfectly to the situation in which it is given. If it only corresponds perfectly with the teachings but does not meet the needs of the listeners, it’s not a good Dharma talk; it’s not appropriate.

[Description of Dharma Talk Notated From Wikipedia]

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Trust Your Life: Dharma Talk by Karen Maezen Miller

Karen Maezen Miller: Trust Your Life
May 25 2019 Southern Palm Zen Group

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Karen Maezen Miller Sensei, priest, teacher, and author of Momma Zen, Handwash Cold, Paradise in Plain Sight, as well as numerous contributions to books and magazines on mindfulness and meditation and zen practice in everyday life.

——-

A Dharma talk (Sanskrit) or Dhamma talk (Pali) or Dharma sermon (Japanese: 法語 teisho[1] (ほうご, Hōgo), Chinese: 法語) is a public discourse on Buddhism by a Buddhist teacher.[1][2]

In some Zen traditions a Dharma talk may be referred to as a teisho.[3] However, according to Taizan Maezumi and Bernard Glassman,[4] a teisho is “a formal commentary by a Zen master on a koan or Zen text. In its strictest sense, teisho is non-dualistic and is thus distinguished from a Dharma talk, which is a lecture on a Buddhist topic.”[5] In this sense, a teisho is thus a formal Dharma talk.[6] Vietnamese master Thich Nhat Hanh says the following about Dharma talks:[7]

A Dharma talk must always be appropriate in two ways: it must accord perfectly with the spirit of the Dharma and it must also respond perfectly to the situation in which it is given. If it only corresponds perfectly with the teachings but does not meet the needs of the listeners, it’s not a good Dharma talk; it’s not appropriate.

[Description of Dharma Talk Notated From Wikipedia]

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Shodokan: Dharma Talk by Mushin Sensei

Mushin Sensei: Shodokan
2019 Southern Palm Zen Group

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——-

A Dharma talk (Sanskrit) or Dhamma talk (Pali) or Dharma sermon (Japanese: 法語 teisho[1] (ほうご, Hōgo), Chinese: 法語) is a public discourse on Buddhism by a Buddhist teacher.[1][2]

In some Zen traditions a Dharma talk may be referred to as a teisho.[3] However, according to Taizan Maezumi and Bernard Glassman,[4] a teisho is “a formal commentary by a Zen master on a koan or Zen text. In its strictest sense, teisho is non-dualistic and is thus distinguished from a Dharma talk, which is a lecture on a Buddhist topic.”[5] In this sense, a teisho is thus a formal Dharma talk.[6] Vietnamese master Thich Nhat Hanh says the following about Dharma talks:[7]

A Dharma talk must always be appropriate in two ways: it must accord perfectly with the spirit of the Dharma and it must also respond perfectly to the situation in which it is given. If it only corresponds perfectly with the teachings but does not meet the needs of the listeners, it’s not a good Dharma talk; it’s not appropriate.

[Description of Dharma Talk Notated From Wikipedia]

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Flat Mountain Temple: Dharma Talk by Jishin Sensei

Jishin Sensei: Flat Mountain Temple
February 23 2019 Southern Palm Zen Group

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Jishin Sensei talks on learning to trust that our life and our practice are the way of enlightenment.

——-

A Dharma talk (Sanskrit) or Dhamma talk (Pali) or Dharma sermon (Japanese: 法語 teisho[1] (ほうご, Hōgo), Chinese: 法語) is a public discourse on Buddhism by a Buddhist teacher.[1][2]

In some Zen traditions a Dharma talk may be referred to as a teisho.[3] However, according to Taizan Maezumi and Bernard Glassman,[4] a teisho is “a formal commentary by a Zen master on a koan or Zen text. In its strictest sense, teisho is non-dualistic and is thus distinguished from a Dharma talk, which is a lecture on a Buddhist topic.”[5] In this sense, a teisho is thus a formal Dharma talk.[6] Vietnamese master Thich Nhat Hanh says the following about Dharma talks:[7]

A Dharma talk must always be appropriate in two ways: it must accord perfectly with the spirit of the Dharma and it must also respond perfectly to the situation in which it is given. If it only corresponds perfectly with the teachings but does not meet the needs of the listeners, it’s not a good Dharma talk; it’s not appropriate.

[Description of Dharma Talk Notated From Wikipedia]

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The Wheel Maker: Dharma Talk by Mushin Sensei

Mushin Sensei: The Wheel Maker
December 8 2018 Southern Palm Zen Group

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——-

A Dharma talk (Sanskrit) or Dhamma talk (Pali) or Dharma sermon (Japanese: 法語 teisho[1] (ほうご, Hōgo), Chinese: 法語) is a public discourse on Buddhism by a Buddhist teacher.[1][2]

In some Zen traditions a Dharma talk may be referred to as a teisho.[3] However, according to Taizan Maezumi and Bernard Glassman,[4] a teisho is “a formal commentary by a Zen master on a koan or Zen text. In its strictest sense, teisho is non-dualistic and is thus distinguished from a Dharma talk, which is a lecture on a Buddhist topic.”[5] In this sense, a teisho is thus a formal Dharma talk.[6] Vietnamese master Thich Nhat Hanh says the following about Dharma talks:[7]

A Dharma talk must always be appropriate in two ways: it must accord perfectly with the spirit of the Dharma and it must also respond perfectly to the situation in which it is given. If it only corresponds perfectly with the teachings but does not meet the needs of the listeners, it’s not a good Dharma talk; it’s not appropriate.

[Description of Dharma Talk Notated From Wikipedia]

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Caveat:

"Menju"or "Face to Face Transmission" aside from being the title of a chapter in Dogen Zenji's Shobogenzo, is also the name for one of the most basic Zen traditions. This "face to face" started with Shakyamuni Buddha holding up a flower on Vulture Peak and Mahakashyapa simply smiling. It is akin to the gaze between mother and child; a mirroring; a nourishment for mutual development.

Today we have the technological "IndraNet." It offers seemingly endless resources for the sharing of written and graphic teachings. This blog is one such nodule in the vast net.

However, the blog is in no way intended to replace Menju, our being together as a group or individually with a teacher. This blog is a service only. Its intention is to use the form, like the banks of a river, to direct or awaken the flow of ancient and contemporary wisdom for ourselves and the world we are part of.

Traveling in this blog, newcomers to our group may get a scent of the climate we practice in; a taste of what appeals to those who practice with us; and might take a step to sit with us and discover what it means to be with lovers of true silence. The silence that echoes from every teaching that connects and says "I have been here all along. There never was a need to search. Rest in this shared wisdom and find the place that seems most natural." Doshin Sensei